skip to Main Content

While most services require a minyan of at least ten people, Passover Korban must be offered before a quorum of thirty people – it must be conducted before kahal adat yisrael, the congregation of the congregation of Israel; ten are needed for the assembly, ten for the congregation, and ten for Israel. According to some Talmudic authorities, such as Rav Kahana IV, women counted in the minyan for the Passover sacrifice (B. Pesachim 79b). The Passover sacrifice (Hebrew: קרבן פסח, Romanized: Quban Pesaḥ), also known as the Passover lamb or Passover lamb, is the sacrifice that commands the Israelites to ritually slaughter on Passover night and eat with bitter herbs and matzos on the first night of the feast. According to the Torah, it was first offered on the night of the exodus from Egypt. Although sacrifice was practiced by Jews in ancient times, today it is only part of the observance of Beta-Israel, Karaites, and Samaritans. While the Passover lamb symbolizes that God saves the Jews from Egyptian slavery, its deeper meaning is Jesus, “the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world” (John 1:29). His sacrifice moves us all into faith from death to life. He saves us from the death sentence of sin to the true Promised Land: heaven. “Your lamb must be perfect, a male, a year; You can take it to sheep or goats. (Exodus 12:5) “Nor shall you break a bone” (Ex 12:46). The Lord Jesus actually accomplished this.

John 19:36 says, “For it was done that the scriptures might be fulfilled: `No bone of him shall be broken.` Here`s a very amazing thing. How could the Lord become a Passover lamb? According to the Talmud, forty years before the destruction of the Temple, that is, one year before the crucifixion of the Lord, the Roman emperor issued a decree forbidding stoning to death. If someone is stoned to death, their bones are broken. The Jews executed men by stoning, while the Romans executed men by crucifixion. When Pilate commanded the Jews to test the Lord according to their own law, the Jews said they had no power to kill anyone (John 18:31). This is further proof. The Lord prophesied that he would be crucified and not stoned to death. Otherwise, he could not become the paschal lamb. Then came the Day of Unleavened Bread, when the Passover lamb had to be sacrificed. Yeshua sent Peter and John and said, “Go and prepare us to eat the Passover.” Where should we prepare for this? ” they asked. He replied, “When you enter the city, a man will hit you with a glass of water. Follow him to the house where he enters and say to the owner of the house, “The Master asks, `Where is the guest room where I can eat the Passover with my disciples?` He shows you a large room upstairs, fully furnished.

Get ready there. They went to find things exactly as Yeshua had told them. So they prepared for Passover. (Luke 22:7-13) In Exodus chapter 12, the Torah gives instructions for the celebration of the Passover. The children of Israel were to choose a lamb for the Passover sacrifice on the 10th day of the 1st month, 4 days before the actual slaughter. According to John`s timeline, this is the 10th day of the 1st month when Yeshua enters Jerusalem and people make their choices. In Christianity, the sacrifice of the Passover lamb is considered accomplished by the crucifixion and death of Jesus, who therefore also receives the title of Lamb of God. [8] [9] A central lesson of the Passover lamb is that his shed blood provoked God`s wrath to “pass” over those who used it in their homes. The sacrificial animal, which was either a lamb or a goat, must have been a male, one year old and without blemish.

Each family or society offered together an animal that did not require selikah (laying on of hands), although it was mandatory to determine who should participate in the sacrifice so that slaughter could take place with the right intentions. Only those who were circumcised and clean before the law were allowed to participate, and they were forbidden to have leaven food in their possession when the Passover lamb was slaughtered. The beast was killed on the eve of Passover, on the afternoon of the 14th of Nisan,[1] after Tamid`s sacrifice had been slaughtered, that is, at three o`clock or, if the eve of Passover fell on Friday, at two o`clock. [2] This blood, which atones for my sins, must be perfect. “Whatever has a defect, you will not offer; it must not be accepted for you, it must be perfect to be accepted” (Leviticus 22:20–21). At the first Passover, God commanded every house to offer this perfect blood for each of its souls: “Choose lambs for your families and kill the Passover lamb” (Exodus 12:21). More than 700 years later, the prophet Isaiah foretold the future Messiah, who would be “led like a lamb to the slaughter” (Isaiah 53:7). After another 750 years, John the Baptist identified the One who arrived as that perfect Passover lamb—Jesus Christ: “Behold, the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world” (John 1:29) Fulfillment: Yeshua, the Lamb of God, was delivered and publicly killed on a Roman execution stake when the Passover lambs were slaughtered. By the blood of the Lamb placed on the doorjambs of the houses of believers, the Israelites (and some Egyptians) were saved from the last of the ten plagues: the death of the firstborn. When Nissan 14th fell on the Sabbath, the first group was stationed on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, the second group at ḥel, the space between the temple wall and the temple hall, while the third group remained in the temple courtyard, waiting for the evening when they would take their lambs home and roast them on a pomegranate skewer. Any other day they could do it before nightfall (and if the 15th Nissan fell on the Sabbath, they had to do it).

Bones should not be broken during cooking or eating. The lamb was placed on the table at the evening banquet (see Passover Seder) and was eaten by the assembled society after all had satisfied their appetite with ḥagigah or other foods. The victim had to be eaten the same evening, nothing was allowed to spend the night. During the meal, the whole company of the participants was obliged to stay together and each participant had to take a piece of lamb at least the size of an olive. Women and girls could also attend the banquet and eat from the victim. Before eating the Lamb, the following blessing was given: “Blessed are you, the Lord, our God, the King of the world, who sanctified us by your commandments and appointed us to eat the Passover. The hallel was recited during the meal, and when the lamb was eaten, the meaning of the custom was explained and the story of the exodus was told. [2] The lambs were killed and their blood was applied to the altar in an old-fashioned line of fire style. Rows of priests stood ready with pools of gold and silver to pass the blood to the altar. Again, we turn to the Mishnah to learn the details. “The Lord has put all our iniquity upon him. He was oppressed and harassed, but he did not open his mouth; He was led like a lamb to the slaughterhouse, and as a sheep is silent in front of its shearers, so he did not open his mouth.

(Isaiah 53:6-7) The sacrificial animal, which was either a lamb or a kid, was necessarily a male, one year old and without blemish. Each family or society offered a sacrifice together, which did not require “semikah” (laying on of hands), although it was mandatory to determine who should participate in the sacrifice so that the murder could take place with the right intentions. Only those who were circumcised and pure before the law could participate; And they were forbidden to have food in their possession during the killing of the Easter lamb. The beast was killed on the eve of Passover, on the afternoon of September 14. Nisan, after the victim of Tamid had been killed, that is, at three o`clock or, if the eve of Passover fell on Friday, at two o`clock.

What Viewers Are Saying...

Back To Top